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The High Plains Society
for
Applied Anthropology

 

The Applied Anthropologist
2005 Articles

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From Theory to Practice: Anthropology in Business Education
Robert Guang Tian
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005 pp 13 – 22

Business education has traditionally been seen as more “scientific” and statistically oriented, while the anthropological approach employs more subjective and qualitative methods. These methods can be invaluable for business researchers in a number of contexts in terms of corporate culture, consumer behavior, and product design.


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An Assessment of the Tourism Industry in Huanchaco, Peru: Current Impacts and Future Potential for Tourism Development
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 44 – 49
Tracy McNulty

In the summer of 2004 I spent five weeks participating in an ethnographic field school in Huanchaco, Peru, a fishing village on the northern coast. Because of my interests in applied anthropology and the anthropology of tourism, I chose to study the impacts of tourism on the people of this small village.

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Review of "Tribal Culture Resource Management: The Full Circle to Stewardship"
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 60 – 83
Darby C. Stapp and Michael S. Burney

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Language, Politics, and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community By Donna Patrick: Introduction
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 85 – 87
Lawrence F. Van Horn

This book is exciting to contemplate on a lively topic. Language, Politics and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community is the 2003 book version of Donna Patrick’s 1998 Ph.D. dissertation, “Language, Power, and Ethnicity in an Arctic Quebec Community.” The book fits well in hand, is logically organized and attractively presented, and invites perusal.

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Language, Politics, and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community By Donna Patrick: Review
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 88 – 90
Michael A. Downs

This book is intended to address “the question of how minority languages persist, despite the political and economic pressures of dominant colonial languages” (p. 3). The study focuses on the Inuit community of Kuujjuarapik on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay in Arctic Quebec (also known as Nunavik), Canada.

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Language, Politics, and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community By Donna Patrick: Review
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 91 – 93
Ellen M. Schnepel

Language, Politics, and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community is a study of indigenous language maintenance in an Arctic Quebec community, Kuujjuarapik (literally “little big river”), the most southerly Nunavik community on the Hudson Bay coast, where four languages – Inuktitut, Cree, French, and English – are spoken. The Inuit of Arctic Quebec have struggled to survive economically and culturally in a rapidly changing environment in which they have had a limited form of self-government since 1975.

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Language, Politics, and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community By Donna Patrick: Reviews Counterpointed
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 94 – 96
Donna Patrick

The issue of language preservation and endangerment has attracted a great deal of attention in recent sociolinguistic and language planning research. My 2003 book, Language, Politics and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community, contributes to this body of work, examining the historical, political, economic, and social dimensions of Inuktitut language maintenance in a multilingual Inuit community in Northern Quebec.


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The Business End of Anthropology: A Student’s Exploration of a Culture of Commerce
No. 1, Vol. 25, Spring, 2005  pp 106 – 107
Shannon Gray

On scores of occasions and in every situation, the string of queries leading to the Inevitable One begins: “What do you do? What are you going to school for? Business and what? What are you going to do with THAT?” Business and anthropology are two words hardly ever used in the same sentence, and yet I’m planning to make a career out of both of them. “Are you crazy?” is the next question (usually) unspoken, and yet barely under the surface.


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