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Chinese-Canadians, Canadian-Chinese: Coping and Adapting in North America, by Robert Guang Tian

Reviewed by Dru C. Gladney

Chinese-Canadians, Canadian-Chinese: Coping and Adapting in North America, published by the Edwin Mellen Press in 1999, marks a new watershed in the study of overseas Chinese and other diasporic refugee communities in that it has been produced by one of these new global citizens. The author, Dr. Robert Guang Tian, is a Chinese Canadian who arrived in Canada as part of the world-wide dispersion of young Chinese intellectuals following the infamous 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. He thus entered into Canadian society on the wave a new Chinese migration, one that has followed many previous waves washing from China to North America and helping to transform the very nature of Canadian and U.S. societies. Canada has absorbed over 300,000 Chinese immigrants, and Toronto has the largest Chinese community in North America with 5 separate and growing “Chinatowns.” It is now in the process of taking in even more from post- Communist Mainland China. How will they adapt? How will they integrate not only into the Canadian mainstream but also into the other Chinese communities that preceded them? These are but some of the questions that this study seeks to answer.

High Plains Applied Anthropologist No. 1, Vol. 23, Spring, 2003 pp 107 – 108

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